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Council of Europe

Culturelink review, no.35/November 2001 - contents - imprint - archive

Culture and civil society: new relationships with the third sector

by Rod Fisher and Roger Fox
Policy Note No. 6, Cultural Policies Research and Development Unit, Council of Europe Publishing, Strasbourg, 2001, 75 pp.
ISBN 92-871-4549-0

The new title in the Council of Europe's Policy Note Series, Culture and civil society: new relationships with the third sector, intends to better formulate the nature of the relationship between culture and civil society and the implications of such a relationship, as well as to highlight examples of interesting practice. In that respect it builds directly on one of the chief conclusions of the Round Table on Civil Society, 'Everyone for Themselves - Culture as an Agent for Democracy in Europe', organised by the Council of Europe and held in Stockholm on 1 April 1998.

The study begins with context setting by listing some perceived threats to civil society. It examines different concepts and definitions of culture, civil society and the third sector and outlines the factors that facilitate the creation and sustainability of civil society. In the next section, the authors draw attention to the need for a social ethic in cultural promotion, prior to looking theoretically and then practically at the way culture can foster civil society. Finally, in drawing together some conclusions for the Council of Europe, governments at all levels, artists and cultural organisations and the third sector, the authors attempt to compile a very basic series of indicators that might be used to measure the effectiveness of actions designed to further the bonds between culture and civil society.

By showing the ways in which the arts and culture can fulfil broader societal objectives, the authors demonstrate that the mutual strengthening of cultural processes and civil cohesion should be increasingly recognised in policy shaping.

For more information, please contact: Cultural Policies Research and Development Unit, Cultural Policy and Action Department, Council of Europe, F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, France; fax: +33(0) 388 41 37 82; e-mail: decsrdu@coe.int; http://culture.coe.int/rdu

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Tax Incentives for Private Support to Culture

by Péter Inkei
The Budapest Observatory/Council of Europe, Strasbourg 2001, 61 pp.

The study Tax Incentives for Private Support to Culture is published by the Regional Observatory on Financing Culture in East-Central Europe (The Budapest Observatory) and the Council of Europe within the framework of its MOSAIC Project. It reflects the belief that a favourable legal and fiscal environment for private support to culture can be achieved only by reaching a common and improved understanding of a range of concepts, some of which are explored in this publication.

Since the countries in the eastern half of Europe have taken the path of the market economy, private support has occupied a similar position in their cultural policies to that in the West, including the acknowledgement of claims for positive fiscal treatment. The implementation of this principle is different from country to country, both in the West and in the East.

In this publication, private support to culture is observed from the point of view of cultural policies. By inspecting its various forms and aspects, the study contributes to the creation of a favourable legal (fiscal) environment for private support to culture, which means that this is not a manual for field practitioners. The country profiles are meant to serve primarily as illustrations, rather than user guidelines, since printed manuals on fiscal topics have a short life cycle as tax laws may change from year to year.

The profiles of 14 countries in East-Central Europe are presented: Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Yugoslavia, as well as computational simulations using examples of corporate businesses and private individuals. Extracts from national laws are also presented.

To obtain the publication, please contact: MOSAIC Project, Cultural Policy and Action Department, Council of Europe, F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, France, fax: +33 3 88 41 37 82; e-mail: zoey.grummitt@coe.int

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Arts Organisations and their Education Programmes - Responding to a need for change

by Tuula Yrjö-Koskinen
MOSAIC, Council of Europe, Strasbourg, 2001, 53 pp.

Within the framework of the MOSAIC Project (Managing an Open and Strategic Approach in Culture), the Council of Europe has published the study Arts Organisations and their Education Programmes: Responding to a need for change prepared by Tuula Yrjö-Koskinen, an active promoter of creative education work in music in Finland and an education manager.

The report touches on many central issues that we face today, including the need for arts institutions to renew themselves in response to changing cultural, educational and performance needs. The author also offers some visionary reflections on the potential of the arts to claim a central place in our lives. The study analyses some of the fundamental issues related to the curricula of arts education and explores the relationship between the educational and artistic policies and practice. The subject is presented from both general and practical perspectives, with some interesting examples of creative education work in music and the arts.

The entire publication is available at the Council of Europe web site at: http://culture.coe.int/mosaic/eng/tuula.htm

For more information, please contact: MOSAIC Project, Cultural Policy and Action Department, Council of Europe, F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, France; fax: +33 3 88 41 37 82; e-mail: decsrdu@coe.int; http://culture.coe.int/clt/eng/

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Funding the future: A user's manual for fund-raising in the arts

by Andrew McIlroy
MOSAIC, Council of Europe, Strasbourg, 2001, 81 pp.

Funding the future: A user's manual for fundraising in the arts is a publication appearing in a new collection of small guides aimed at cultural policy-makers and cultural administrators, as well as directors of cultural institutions, managers of cultural centres and associations, or project leaders. The intention of such guides is to offer policy-makers, administrators and managers a large sample of measures, incentives or practices that have been applied effectively somewhere in Europe, in order to help them to define by themselves which solutions might be the most appropriate in their own national context.

Funding the future: A user's manual for fundraising in the arts is dedicated to what is most probably one of the major concerns of cultural managers all over Europe. Fund-raising in the arts has become an art in itself. In order to help cultural managers to develop their skills in this aspect, the author proposes a number of practical suggestions. He goes back over a number of fundamental concepts and definitions in order to develop a clear understanding of the different kinds of possible funding. He illustrates several effective techniques which may help when applying for funding and provides a detailed list of sources of information and of potential donors.

The content of the publication can be found at the Council of Europe's web site: http://culture.coe.int/mosaic/eng/mcilroy.htm

For more information, please contact: MOSAIC Project, Cultural Policy and Action Department, Council of Europe, F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, France; fax: +33 3 88 41 37 82; e-mail: decsrdu@coe.int; http://culture.coe.int/clt/eng/

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The Council of Europe Declaration on Cultural Diversity

Council of Europe Publishing, Strasbourg, 2001, 17 pp.
ISBN 92-871-4663-2

The Declaration on Cultural Diversity was adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 7 December 2000 at the 733rd meeting of the Ministers' Deputies and was published in September 2001 in the form of a bilingual (English and French) brochure. The Council of Europe Declaration on Cultural Diversity has several visible implications for cultural policy at the global and local levels:

  • The declaration is the first international instrument that has been developed on the subject and, as such, it creates a framework for developing a European approach to cultural diversity.
  • The declaration sets out a definition of cultural diversity. The most difficult aspect of confronting the challenge of cultural diversity, nationally and internationally, has been that of finding a common definition for the subject. The definition in the declaration is a great breakthrough, because it enables the same text to address the social expression of culturally diverse societies and, at the same time, the products and processes of cultural production.
  • The declaration affirms the importance of sustaining and maintaining cultural diversity as a value of essential importance, both for the free and creative reproduction of cultural life, and for the creativity and viability of economic exchange in the global market.
  • The declaration acknowledges the parallel value of international agreements that promote cultural diversity with those whose objective is to promote world trade.
  • The declaration provides a framework for the organisation to develop a work programme to elaborate a catalogue of measures which could assist member states in confronting the challenge of cultural diversity.

For more information, please contact: Cultural Policy and Action Department, Council of Europe, F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, France, fax: +33 3 88 41 37 82; e-mail: decsrdu@coe.int; http://culture.coe.int/clt/eng/